Personal details

Name
Dr Stephen Cox
Position(s)
Director, Centre of METS Business Innovation
QUT Business School,
Management
Director, Higher Deg Res Studies
QUT Business School,
Administration Services - Business,
Research Support Office - Business
Discipline *
Business and Management
Phone
+61 7 3138 1776
Email
Location
View location details (QUT staff and student access only)
Identifiers and profiles
ORCID iD
Qualifications

Doctor of Philosophy (University of Queensland)

Keywords

Technological innovation systems, Technology diffusion, Industry development, Technology transitions, Global value chains

* Field of Research code, Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC), 2008

Biography

Stephen Cox completed a PhD in social psychology at the University of Queensland. After completing the PhD, he owned and operated a statistical consulting company. Since returning to academia, research interests have been on the functioning of global value chains, having published papers on the digital video game industry, and the mining industry.

His current research focus is on the functioning of technological innovation systems within the biorefining, biofuels and mining industries.  This research examines the innovation processes necessary for the development and diffusion of system changing technologies.

I am seeking research students (either MPhil or PhD) wanting to undertake research into the innovation systems that support society wide technological innovations and subsequent industrial development. For example, Australia, like many countries, is attempting to develop new industries in clean energy. For each of these, the pathway from innovation to a viable, self-sustaining industry is difficult. I am interested in exploring the barriers that prevent successful development of the innovation system in which each technology operates.

  • Battery industries, with industry opportunities ranging from:
    • extraction focused activities;
    • innovations and industry development in mineral processing within Australia, rather exporting bulk raw minerals;
    • local battery manufacturing;
    • recycling of batteries – a growing major concern for batteries.
  • A hydrogen fuel industry that allows low or no emission energy.
    • Hydrogen can be used a fuel source,. There are multiple possible approaches to manufacturing hydrogen. Each technology has its own, interrelated innovation system. And each has its own barriers. What are these barriers and how can they be reduced? What can be done to increase the development of clean production technologies rather than high emission approaches?
      • If manufactured cleanly using hydrolysis and renewable energy, Hydrogen can be a low or no emission fuel source.
      • If manufactured by coal gasification, then carbon capture and storage is required to deal with the emissions.
  • Decarbonisation of existing industries, such as the mining industry.
    • For example, batteries require mining of many rare metals, but mining is energy intensive. How can mines decarbonise their own activities, so that even if we have emission free transport, the mineral extraction and processing technologies use clean energy?
    • How can the mining industry intersect with the clean energy innovation systems to assist with decarbonisation?

Thus I am seeking research students interested in these sorts of problems.

 

This information has been contributed by Dr Stephen Cox.

Experience

After completing my PhD, I started a statistical consulting company. I provide advice and undertook statistical analyses for corporate clients, and university researchers who required advanced statistical support.

Eventually I was ‘in-sourced’ back into academia as a methods and statistical adviser within the QUT Business School.

This information has been contributed by Dr Stephen Cox.

Publications

For publications by this staff member, visit QUT ePrints, the University's research repository.

Supervision