Personal details

Name
Dr Margaret McElrea
Position(s)
Research Manager
Faculty of Health,
School - Public Health and Social Work,
Research - Public Health
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Faculty of Health,
School - Public Health and Social Work,
Research - Public Health
IHBI Membership
Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation (IHBI),
IHBI Health Projects,
IHBI Public Health and Social Work - HDHS
Discipline *
Public Health and Health Services
Email
Location
View location details (QUT staff and student access only)
Identifiers and profiles
LinkedIn
Qualifications

PhD (University of Queensland)

Professional memberships
and associations
* Field of Research code, Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC), 2008

Biography

Dr Margaret McElrea is a research fellow at the School of Public Health and Social Work, QUT. She is also research manager of QUT’s Cough Asthma and Airways Research Group.

In addition, Dr McElrea currently holds positions as Respiratory Clinical Measurement Scientist. with Queensland Children’s Hospital & Clinical Measurement Scientist – Indigenous Respiratory Outreach Care Program, Statewide Clinical Respiratory Network (for paediatric outreach clinics and Indigenous health worker spirometry training program).

Career Summary

Dr McElrea has over three decades of experience in clinical lung function testing and clinical research in Australia and Canada. She also spent nine years of teaching spirometry to primary care nurses, general practitioners and  Indigenous health workers. The vast knowledge Dr McElrea has gleaned from her years experience in the field of clinical respiratory studies currently informs and guides her research work.

Since 2012, Dr McElrea has published over 20 scholarly works in journals.

 

This information has been contributed by Dr Margaret McElrea.

Experience

Research Translation

Blake, Tamara L., Chang, Anne B., Chatfield, Mark D., Marchant, Julie M., & McElrea, Margaret S. (2020) Global Lung Function Initiative-2012 ‘other/mixed’ spirometry reference equation provides the best overall fit for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young adults. Respirology25(3), pp. 281-288.
This was the first publication to report spirometry reference values for Australian First Nations children and young adults from data that was collected using current international guidelines in Queensland and Northern Territory.  It is the first report of lung function in healthy Torres Strait Islander children.  The findings give a clear recommendation that the “other/mixed” category of the Global Lung Function Initiative reference, which give volumes approximately 6-7% smaller than Caucasian,  are appropriate for use in First Nations Australian children.  This recommendation is directly translational can give confidence in the choice of reference values against which to interpret clinical results of spirometry to assist in the diagnosis of respiratory diseases such as asthma.  The findings refute earlier reports that the spirometric lung volumes of Aboriginal children were much smaller than Caucasian.
Blake, Tamara, Chang, Anne, Chatfield, Mark, Marchant, Julie, Petsky, Helen, & McElrea, Margaret (2020) How does parent/self-reporting of common respiratory conditions compare with medical records among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) children and young adults? Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health56(1), pp. 55-60.
This paper highlights the complexities of obtaining full medical history for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children given the differences between medical history given by parents and that obtained from medical records.  The data highlights the importance of researchers understanding the likely levels of health literacies when designing questionnaires and also provides a reminder to health care workers to consider how effectively they are communicating a child’s clinical condition to families.
Blake, Tamara, Chang, Anne, Chatfield, Mark, Marchant, Julie, Petsky, Helen, & McElrea, Margaret (2019) Fractional exhaled nitric oxide values in Indigenous Australians 3 to 16 years of age. Chest156(2), pp. 239-246.
This is the first report of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels for healthy Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from data that was collected using current international testing guidelines in Queensland and Northern Territory.  The findings give a clear recommendation that the “cut-off” of 50ppb is appropriate for use in First Nations Australian children.  This recommendation is directly translational for the interpretation of clinical FeNO measurements to assist in the diagnosis and management of asthma.
Recent Grants

  • Principal Investigator – COAG National Partnership Agreement to Close the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes for Indigenous Respiratory Reference Values Study under Indigenous Respiratory Outreach Care (IROC) program
  • TPCHF Innovation Grant INN2018-24 –  $84,125.67
  • CHF Equipment Grant 10609 – $56,835
  • Statewide Clinical Networks – $160,000

Awards

  • Best Thoracic Society Training Video 2018  (Award to L Rodwell, I Schneider & MS McElrea for Spirometry – Key Concepts)
  • ANZSRS Advanced Education Grant – 2018 – $2,000
This information has been contributed by Dr Margaret McElrea.

Publications

For publications by this staff member, visit QUT ePrints, the University's research repository.